Sep 102017
 

E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial isn’t just a 1980s classic but a classic period and influential to many generations due to a tightly written script, characters we can actually care about and just an adorable little alien who evokes emotions from laughter to sadness. It may not be Spielberg’s masterpiece, but it is timeless.

 

 

E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial
(1982)

Genre(s): Science Fiction, Adventure, Drama, Comedy
Universal | PG – 115 min. – $39.98 | September 12, 2017

Date Published: 09/10/2017 | Author: The Movieman

 


MOVIE INFO:
Directed by: Steven Spielberg
Writer(s): Melissa Mathison (written by)
Cast: Dee Wallace, Peter Coyote, Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore
DISC INFO:
Features: Featurettes, Deleted Scenes, Gallery, Theatrical Trailer
Digital Copy: Yes
Formats Included: 4K, Blu-ray
Number of Discs: 2
Audio: English (DTS:X), Brazilian Portuguese (DTS 5.1), French (DTS 5.1), Japanese (DTS 5.1), Spanish (DTS 5.1), English (DTS 2.0), Japanese (DTS 2.0)
Video: 2160p/Widescreen 1.85
Dynamic Range: HDR10
Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish
Codecs: HEVC / H.265 (4K)
Region(s): A, B, C

Note: Screen Captures from previous Blu-ray releases.
These DO NOT in any way, shape or form, represent the 4K UHD.


THE MOVIE — 5.0/5


Plot Synopsis: This timeless story follows the unforgettable journey of a lost alien and the 10-year-old boy he befriends. Join Elliott (HENRY THOMAS), Gertie (DREW BARRYMORE) and Michael (ROBERT MACNAUGHTON) as they come together to help E.T. find his way back home.

Quick Hit Review: Considering E.T. came out in 1982 when I was only 2, my first viewing for this probably was somewhere in the mid-80s on VHS. I think. Whenever it was, this Steven Spielberg directed movie has influenced millions movie-lovers and numerous filmmakers rising up today in their own rights, not to mention you’ve got a series like Stranger Things. This was probably only my third time watching E.T. after many years and it still holds up so well going on 35 years later. The acting by the kids is good, Drew Barrymore, did get on my nerves to be honest however, and the effects works whether for its time or even today, is outstanding, though some of E.T.’s animatronics were a bit off in spots.

I’m not going to write a long essay on what E.T. has meant to filmmaking but personally speaking, this is one of my favorite films of all-time and although I haven’t seen it a ton of times, again it didn’t entirely resonate my early life in the 80s (the 90s was more influential) but no doubt this is a fantastic film through and through.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES – 4.5/5


This release comes with a header-embossed slip cover. Inside contains a redemption code for the Digital HD and the 35th anniversary Blu-ray Copy.

Deleted Scenes (3:40; HD) include scenes removed though with no introduction, we don’t get reasons, though I suspect due to pacing issues.

Steven Spielberg & E.T. (12:31; HD) looks at the origins of the movie and how/when he came with the concept and how it personally impacted him.

The E.T. Journals (53:38; SD) is a two-part making-of documentary shot on location back in 1981 and is well made and unique to even get something this old when BTS was not exactly routine.

A Look Back (37:43; SD) is a retrospective featurette made, I think, back during its 20th anniversary or thereabouts.

The Evolution and Creation of E.T. (50:16; SD) is another well-made featurette, made for the 20th anniversary, containing interviews with the cast, especially Spielberg, to go along with BTS footage from back then.

The E.T. Reunion (17:56; SD) is a fun reunion with the cast and crew 20 years later.

The Music of E.T.: A Discussion with John Williams (10:04; SD) – The composer provides his insights into creating the iconic score.

The 20th Anniversary Premiere (17:49; SD) covers the premiere event for the big event release.

Also includes some Designs, Photographs and Marketing material, the Theatrical Trailer (1:57; SD) and the Special Olympics TV Spot (1:02; SD). And for the sake of completeness I will mention there is a BD-Live portal, but nowadays it’s a useless feature…

 


VIDEO – 5.0/5


E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial is the latest to get the 4K treatment and what a treat this is. The movie is shown in its original 1.85 widescreen aspect ratio, and original theatrical version (no guns CGI’d out), with a 2160p ultra-high definition transfer (HEVC/H.265 codec). The picture quality is fantastic looking with bright colors, sharp detail and courtesy of the HDR10, blacks are well balanced without losing the detail within those shots. This is reference quality work although Blade Runner still holds the crown for THE best UHD movie.

AUDIO – 5.0/5


Receiving a moderate upgrade over the precious release’s DTS-HD MA 7.1 track, this release gets a DTS: X track which, unsurprisingly, sounds amazing. While dialogue levels and some of the sound effects (like the ship landing/taking off) sounds great, where this really comes to life is with John Williams’ heartfelt and dramatic score, particularly the depth-filled finale.

 


OVERALL – 5.0/5


Overall, E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial isn’t just a 1980s classic but a classic period and influential to many generations due to a tightly written script, characters we can actually care about and just an adorable little alien who evokes emotions from laughter to sadness. It may not be Spielberg’s masterpiece, but it is timeless. The 4K release includes all the features from the previous release and remarkable video and audio transfers.

 

 

 

 

Check out some more 1080p screen caps by going to page 2. Please note, these do contain spoilers.

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