Oct 252016
 

Living in the Age of Airplanes is a beautiful documentary from filmmaker Brian J. Terwilliger and I enjoyed it for the fact it’s not about the mechanics of airplanes, which I’m sure NatGeo has covered in the past, but instead an appreciation on what they have brought to humanity at large.

 

 

Living in the Age of Airplanes
(2016)

Genre(s): Documentary, Special Interest
National Geographic | NR – 47 min. – $32.97 | October 25, 2016

Date Published: 10/25/2016 | Author: The Movieman

 


MOVIE INFO:
Directed by:
Brian J. Terwilliger
Writer(s): NA
Cast: Harrison Ford (narrator)
DISC INFO:
Features:
Featurettes
Digital Copy: No
Formats Included: Blu-ray
Number of Discs: 1
Audio: English (DTS-HD MA 7.1), English (DTS-HD MA 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Chinese (Dolby Digital 5.1)
Video: 1080p/Widescreen 1.78
Subtitles: English SDH, Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Disc Size: 22.2 GB
Codec: MPEG-4 AVC
Region(s): A, B, C

 


THE MOVIE — 4.0/5


Synopsis: Living in the Age of Airplanes offers a fresh perspective on a modern-day miracle that many of us take for granted: flying. Narrated by Harrison Ford and featuring an original score by the late James Horner, the film takes viewers to 18 countries across all seven continents to illuminate how airplanes have empowered a century of global connectedness our ancestors could never have imagined.

During the vast majority of mankind’s 200,000 year existence, walking was the fastest means of travel. Yet today, just 175 years after the introduction of the steam engine, boarding a jet to travel thousands of miles in a matter of hours is more often viewed as an inconvenience than a world-changing technological marvel.

Living in the Age of Airplanes is directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (One Six Right) and produced by Terwilliger and Bryan H. Caroll, Director of Photography is Andrew Waruszewski and Editor is Brad Besser.

Quick Hit Review: What I enjoyed about this documentary is that it’s more of a travelogue. There are absolutely no interviews and instead displays the beauty from around the world, oft places not photographed very often including remote islands to the South Pole. It’s a beautiful visual essay and with Harrison Ford’s boisterous voice work, it’s a relaxing journey that is more how airplanes changed life as we know it rather than the internal mechanics or even the event of flight. It is a short feature but any fan of National Geographic content will find great enjoyment out of this.

 

SPECIAL FEATURES – 3.5/5


This release comes with a glossy slip cover.

ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE:
Alaska Flying (2:42; HD)
is a montage of deleted footage.

Flight Over Africa (4:56; HD) – The biplane sequence from Out of Africa is re-created 30 years later.

Hawaii (2:53; HD) is a deleted scene of one of the remote places on Earth that is almost exclusively visited by air.

Plane Spotting (2:18; HD) – A collection of the crew’s best takeoff and landing shots captured on 5 continents.

Alaska Flying II (2:42; HD) – Same visuals as “Alaska Flying” but with radio communications.

Theatrical Trailer 2 (1:33; HD)

BEHIND-THE-SCENES:
Impossible Shots: Visual Effects (12:17; HD)
– Learn how the impossible shots in the film came to life.

Flower Sequence Deconstructed (3:55; HD) – A unique, real-time look inside the film’s most complex sequences.

Making of the Alaska House (4:45; HD) goes inside at how the sequence was created.

3 Stories in 4 Minutes (4:03; HD) – Three stories: One Camera, Underwater in the Maldives, Journey to the South Pole.

Seeing Aviation for the First Time (2:49; HD) – Witness aviation through the eyes of a group of kids in Kenya.

In-Flight Premiere (3:58; HD) – This looks at the film’s debut on board an airplane.

There are also a collection of videos from the partners who funded and/or participated this project. Here’s a quick rundown: The Future of Airbus (9:16), The A320neo Family (1:26), Dream to Reality (3:16), The Super Hub (2:43), Meteorology at FedEx (2:21), Why Memphis (1:16), Adaptive Cycle Engine (2:48), GE9X First Engine Run (0:46) and GE Masterclass (2:05).

 


VIDEO – 5.0/5


Originally made for IMAX and Giant Screen Theaters, Living in the Age of Airplanes looks absolutely gorgeous on Blu-ray. Presented with a 1080p high-definition transfer and a 1.78 widescreen aspect ratio, colors pop off the screen and detail is incredibly sharp and well defined. Outside of a few instances of banding in transition shots, this is a near perfect presentation.

AUDIO – 4.5/5


The DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 track is pretty strong though this isn’t exactly a heavy feature as the bulk of the audio is for either Harrison Ford’s boisterous voice over work, which is a nice touch, or James Horner’s beautiful score. It’s nothing fantastic yet still more than serviceable for a documentary.

 


OVERALL – 3.75/5


Overall, Living in the Age of Airplanes is a beautiful documentary from filmmaker Brian J. Terwilliger and I enjoyed it for the fact it’s not about the mechanics of airplanes, which I’m sure NatGeo has covered in the past, but instead an appreciation on what they have brought to humanity at large. Add to that, the imagery is absolutely gorgeous taking viewers to locations rarely seen. The Blu-ray offers excellent video/audio transfers and a fine selection of bonus features.

 

 

 

 

Check out some more screen caps by going to page 2. Please note, these do contain spoilers.

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