Mar 072012
 

Disclosure is a well made corporate thriller (with an erotic scene thrown in to titillate the audience) with two fine performances from the king and queen of the 1990s. Even with one ridiculous scene where Douglas goes into a virtual reality world, this is still a film worth checking out. Although the Blu-ray is mainly void of features, the audio and video transfers are both good enough for an upgrade.

 

 


Disclosure (1994)


REVIEW NAVIGATION

The Movie
| Special Features | Video Quality | Audio Quality | Overall

 

Genre(s): Suspense, Thriller, Drama
Warner Brothers | R – 128 min. – $19.98 | March 6, 2012

MOVIE INFO:
Directed by:
Barry Levinson
Writer(s):
Michael Crichton (novel); Paul Attanasio (screenplay)
Cast:
Michael Douglas, Demi Moore, Donald Sutherland, Caroline Goodall, Dennis Miller

Theatrical Release Date: December 9, 1994

DISC INFO:
Features:
Theatrical Trailer
Number of Discs:
1

Audio: English (DTS-HD MA 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 5.1)
Video:
1080p/Widescreen 2.40
Subtitles:
English SDH, French, Spanish
Disc Size:
31.4 GB
Codec:
MPEG-4 AVC
Region(s):
A, B, C


THE MOVIE – 4.0/5

Plot Synopsis: His career. His marriage. His future. It’s all on the line for DigiCom executive Tom Sanders (MICHAEL DOUGLAS). He rejected the passionate advance of his new boss (DEMI MOORE). Now she’s charging him with sexual harassment. Suddenly, long-time company man Tom must scramble for his corporate life – a scramble that will lead him into the dazzling cyber world of DigiCom’s new virtual reality corridor… and lay bare a shocking conspiracy among key company personnel.

Quick Hit Review: Between Fatal Attraction, Basic Instinct and Disclosure, Michael Douglas has had some awful luck having affairs with, quite frankly, psychopathic women. Sure, they might be hot (well, Glenn Close not so much), but they get him into major trouble.

In any case, Douglas’ latest wacky femme fatale places third behind Sharon Stone and Glenn Close, but I think on the whole, Disclosure offers a new, and ultimately more realistic, portrayal on the corporate world and politics. Here, it’s much more than just a sultry woman trying to seduce an ex-lover, ruin his marriage and so forth, but instead it goes into a conspiracy involving those within the company. So when it comes to the plot, I found it more intriguing than most suspense-thrillers during the era.

When it comes to the cast, Michael Douglas and Demi Moore once again deliver fine performances and while I can’t say either are at their best, together they share enough chemistry, especially in the one semi-graphic sex scene, to carry the necessary animosity and suspense through the fairly lengthy running time. With regards to the supporting cast, it’s an impressive bunch from Donald Sutherland playing the CEO weasel to Roma Maffia as Douglas’ aggressive lawyer and Caroline Goodall as the supportive wife. I also enjoyed seeing Dennis Miller, mullet and all…

There is only one issue I had with this movie, however. As impressive and, for its time, unique as the story was reversing the empowerment roles of men and women in the workplace, I could only roll my eyes when Michael Douglas has to use a virtual reality device in order to get access to the company’s database and gather necessary evidence to vindicate himself, so he puts on what I could only describe as Virtual Boy prototype goggles (remember those?) and enter into a poorly constructed CGI world. This only stood out because prior, the film primarily sticks with reality and to all of the sudden takes the audience into a sci-fi world from Johnny Mnemonic (which was released in 1995, a year later); it only took me out of an otherwise excellent corporate thriller along the lines of The Firm.

Save for that one scene (which is fairly lengthy), I still found Disclosure to be a well made thriller from director Barry Levinson and based on the novel by Michael Crichton (whose adaptations haven’t always led to good movies, see Congo, Sphere, Timeline, etc.). As a whole, this is a thriller that might not stand out in Michael Douglas and Demi Moore’s lengthy careers and is often overlooked and even underrated, but I would glad recommend giving it a try.

SPECIAL FEATURES – 0.5/5

Theatrical Trailer (1:59; SD) – It might be the only feature, but it’s nice to check out how the trailer was put together.


VIDEO – 4.25/5

Warner Brothers releases Disclosure onto Blu-ray with a good looking 1080p high-definition transfer. The movie is presented in its original 2.40 widescreen aspect ratio and, except for a few scenes that look a tad faded (probably more due to how it was shot) this is a well detailed transfer. The color is also well balanced without appearing pumped up trying to benefit HD and there’s a fine amount of natural film noise, so it appears that DNR was not used (or if it was, it was minimal).

AUDIO – 4.0/5

The disc comes with a nice sounding, and well balanced, 5.1 DTS-HD MA lossless track. Given this is a corporate thriller, you’re not going to get very much from an action standpoint, but dialogue levels sound crisp and clear without topping out while any side action or side chatter are dispersed evenly throughout the other channels. Also benefiting is Ennio Morricone’s score which in itself isn’t much different from any other scores from the ‘90s but still provides adequate depth.



OVERALL – 3.0/5

Overall, Disclosure is a well made corporate thriller (with an erotic scene thrown in to titillate the audience) with two fine performances from the king and queen of the 1990s. Even with one ridiculous scene where Douglas goes into a virtual reality world, this is still a film worth checking out. Although the Blu-ray is mainly void of features, the audio and video transfers are both good enough for an upgrade.

 

Brian Oliver, The Movieman
Published:
03/07/2012

 

Check out some more screen caps by going to page 2. Please note, these do contain spoilers.

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